From the blog

Pluto, planets and you

Engines to power! Turbines to speed!

Action Science Theatre is back, everyone!

I’m only allowed, by law, to use one more exclamation point in this blog, so I’m going to save it for later.

Now that we’ve returned, let’s tackle one of the big problems, something which has dogged humanity since at least 2006.

Is Pluto a planet or not?

We interrupt this programme for an announcement

Hello dear blog reader / podcast listener  / audio drama aficionado,

We have a small announcement to make. Due to commitments from all AST members we have taken the decision to go on hiatus for a few months. Those of you used to getting an episode every month will, no doubt, be disappointed, confused and possibly very angry about this. May we suggest perhaps you have a nice cup of tea?

There we are, that’s better isn’t it?

So, thank you for listening / reading over the past 2 years. We hope when we do return you’ll continue to enjoy AST – like you’d enjoy the smell of freshly cut grass on a summers day.

See you soon (well we wont see you, obviously).

VIVA AST!

This is an April fool

We are delighted to announce that next week sees the launch Action Science TV. This joint venture between ourselves and Sky will bring an air of disappointing excitement to the Saturday evening schedules. And the rest of the time too.

Highlights of the Spring / Summer season include:

  • Semi-Pro Wrestling – with scientists from history (dead scientists parts played by actual wrestlers)
  • The Professor Brian Cox Minute
  • Punch, Punch, Kick, Kick – Neil Degrasse Tyson painstakingly describes his favourite action films, moment by moment
  • In Space No One can Hear you Bream – Science Brian examines the popularity of fishing in space
  • First Degree CERNs – Hilarious footage (sent in by viewers) of people using particle accelerators to open cans and bottles (£200 paid per clip, no means no)

You’ll be able to catch ASTV on Sky channel 3.1415926535897932, maths fans.

Talking about talking

Let’s talk about talking, shall we?

Many scientists and experts believe that to win over the public – to make them feel the same way they do towards their work – is to impart more facts to the public.

Let’s say you want to convince people that your research into genetic engineering should be funded, but people are uncomfortable about the possible applications. So, you painstakingly explain the science behind what you’re doing, pointing out at length how many safeguards you have in place to stop the genetically modified murder-pigeons from escaping the lab. The public, you think, just need to be better informed, and all will be well. Environmental science, biotechnology, nuclear physics,  murder pigeons – all the public needs to do is understand, and they’ll agree with us. There’ll be no more controversy.

This is a very tempting argument, and it sort of feels like it should be true. But the problem is that it’s not even slightly how things work.

Editing Episode 19 - Looping the Loop

The thing with Action Dan and Science Brian, is that they don’t half go on. And on. But the thing with sound effects is that they don’t necessarily go on long enough to cope with ol’ Blather and Blarney over there. So when a sound effect falls short or runs out midway through a scene, it needs to be strung out somehow. And this is where looping comes in.

Box lid from the Loopin' Louie board game

In this game, the players must protect their chickens from the wild meanderings of a maniac in a monoplane. Editing AST is exactly like this in every way.

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